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Released: February 1, 1994


Rating: 4.050 (average of 5 ratings)


Genre: piano-based adult alternative singer/songwriter


Quotable: --


Album Tracks:

  1. Pretty Good Year
  2. God
  3. Bells for Her
  4. Past the Mission
  5. Baker Baker
  6. The Wrong Band
  7. The Waitress
  8. Cornflake Girl
  9. Icicle
  10. Cloud on My Tongue
  11. Space Dog
  12. Yes, Anastasia


Sales:

sales in U.S. only 2 million
sales in U.K. only - estimated --
sales in all of Europe as determined by IFPI – click here to go to their site. --
sales worldwide - estimated 2 million


Peak:

peak on U.S. Billboard album chart 12
peak on U.K. album chart 1 1


Singles/ Hit Songs:

  • Cornflake Girl (1/22/94) #4 UK, #12 MR
  • God (1/29/94) #72 US, #44 UK, #1 MR
  • Pretty Good Year (3/19/94) #7 UK
  • Past the Mission (5/28/94) #31 UK


Awards:

my favorite album of the year One of Blender’s 100 Greatest American Albums


Under the Pink
Tori Amos
Review:
“After sharing personal and emotional accounts on her stunning debut, Little Earthquakes, Tori Amos stirs those sensations up for an eclectic yet beautiful account of female security on Under the Pink” (Wilson). This is “just one woman, her inner demons and a unique way of sitting astride the piano stool” (Blender).

Amos is “always in question of her actions, calling out and interrogating the opposite sex for her own pleasure. But it’s not necessarily with a scolding tone. She’s playful with her signature piano accompaniment, but allows for a twisted mess of guitars, violins, and bass loops, which are quite enigmatic like Kate Bush as well. Baker Baker and Bells for Her are aching with ballad-esque beauty, but the seething The Waitress sparks Amos’ inner devil. She’s quaint at first, but rages into a scalding vocal queen” (Wilson). “Jerry Springer was never this dark” (Blender). “It makes her even more a pioneer for female originality and independence” (Wilson).

“Singles such as God and Cornflake Girl are sultry and provocative, depicting that she’s everything but shy” (Wilson). Under the Pink is typically melodic, but it contains a heavy desire” (Wilson). These are “flame-haired torch songs from hell” (Blender) “with hidden teeth and sexy confessions whispered across her pillow” (Blender). “Amos is still breaking into something more definitive as both a woman and a singer/ songwriter. The lyrical imagery is much more wide open, something that will become Amos’ ever-changing swan song” (Wilson).


Review Source(s):


Last updated October 25, 2008.