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picture of Beethoven

Composed: 1809-1812

First Performed:
December 8, 1813


Rating: 4.500 (average of 2 ratings)


Genre: classical > symphony


Quotable: --


Work(s): *

  1. Symphony No. 7 in A major, Op. 92 [37:40]
* Number in [ ] indicates average duration of piece.


Parts/Movements:

  1. Poco sostenuto – Vivace
  2. Allegretto
  3. Presto
  4. Allegro con brio


Sales: - NA -


Peak: - NA -


Singles/ Hit Songs: - NA -


Awards:

Rated one of the top 1000 albums of all time by Dave’s Music Database. Click to learn more.


Symphony No. 7
Ludwig van Beethoven (composer)
Review:
“Ludwig van Beethoven completed this work in 1812, but withheld the first performance until December 8, 1813, in Vienna. It is scored for pairs of flutes, oboes, clarinets, bassoons, horns, and trumpets, plus timpani and string choir” (Dettmer).

“1812 was an eventful year for the very famous, seriously deafened Beethoven. July was especially noteworthy. At Teplitz he finally met Goethe (1749-1832), but was disappointed to find (he felt) an aging courtier who was no longer a firebrand or kindred democrat; worse yet, a musical dilettante. A week before that only meeting of German giants, Beethoven had written the letter to his mysterious ‘immortal beloved’ that was discovered posthumously in a secret drawer. Then, toward the end of the year, he meddled unbidden in the affairs of his youngest brother, Johann, who was cohabiting contentedly with a housekeeper. Somehow, he found time to compose the last of his ten sonatas for violin and piano and to complete a new pair of symphonies – the Seventh and Eighth – both begun in 1809. He introduced the Seventh at a charity concert for wounded soldiers, and repeated it four nights later by popular demand” (Dettmer).

“Richard Wagner called Symphony No. 7 ‘the apotheosis of the dance,’ meaning of course to praise its Dionysian spirit. But this oxymoron stuck like feathers to hot tar, encouraging irrelevant and awkward choreography (by Isadore Duncan and Léonide Massine among others) and licensing the music appreciation racket to misinterpret Beethoven’s intent as well as his content. Wholly abstract and utterly symphonic, the Seventh was his definitive break with stylistic conventions practiced by Mozart, Haydn, and a legion of lesser mortals who copied them. He stretched harmonic rules, and gave breadth to symphonic forms that Haydn and Mozart anticipated. If, in his orchestral music, Beethoven was the last Austro-German Classicist, he did point those who followed him to the path of Romanticism” (Dettmer).

“While the poco sostenuto introduction begins by observing time-honored rules of harmony, within 62 measures it modulates from A major to the alien keys of C and F major, then back again! The transition from solemn 4/4 meter to 6/8 for the balance of an evergreen vivace movement (in sonata form) further exemplifies Beethoven’s conceptual stretch” (Dettmer).

“Coming from the 20-minute funeral march of his earlier Eroica Symphony, Beethoven created an allegretto ‘slow’ movement. He established a funerary mood (without its being specifically elegiac) through the repetition of a 2/4 rhythmic motif in A minor, the most somber key of the tempered scale. A minor serves more than an expressive function, moreover; it readies us for the reappearance of F major in a tumultuous five-part Scherzo marked Presto. Two trios go slower (assai meno presto), in D major – a long distance harmonically in 1812 from the work’s A major tonic. The beginning of a third trio turns into a short coda capped by five fortissimo chords” (Dettmer).

“A major finally returns in the final movement. Here more than anywhere else in his orchestral music, Beethoven became a race-car driver. As in the ‘slow’ movement, the rhythm is 2/4, but sonata-form replaces ABA. And there’s a grand coda longer than the exposition, the development, or the reprise, which, furthermore, begins in B minor! But modulations bring it back to A major in time for a heart-pounding final lap with the accelerator pressed to the floor” (Dettmer).


Review Source(s):


Last updated April 2, 2008.