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UK album cover

US album cover

Released: Nov. 13, 1995


Rating: 3.684 (average of 11 ratings)


Genre: new wave pop/rock


Quotable: “smart and stylish pop music for discerning listeners” – CdUniverse.com


Album Tracks:

  1. Electric Trains [4:03]
  2. Heaven Knows [4:34]
  3. Grouch of the Day [3:27]
  4. Walk Away [4:43]
  5. This Summer [3:39]
  6. Got To Me (Wilkinson) [3:45]
  7. Long Face [4:31]
  8. I Want You [4:03]
  9. Daphne [3:44]
  10. Lost For Words [1:59]
  11. Great Escape [3:27]
  12. Temptation For Love [3:37]
  13. Sound Asleep [4:38]
  14. Fingertips [5:40]
All songs written by Difford & Tilbrook unless noted otherwise.


Total Running Time: 55:59


Sales:

sales in U.S. only --
sales in U.K. only - estimated --
sales in all of Europe as determined by IFPI – click here to go to their site. --
sales worldwide - estimated --


Peak:

peak on U.S. Billboard album chart --
peak on U.K. album chart 50


Singles/Hit Songs:

  • This Summer (8/21/95) #32 UK
  • Electric Trains (11/6/95) #44 UK
  • Heaven Knows (5/27/96) #27 UK


Ridiculous
Squeeze
Review:
“After nearly 20 years of recording, it would be easy to write Squeeze off as spent creative force – certainly their mosty recent albums have seemed like somewhat forced attempts to recapture the glory days” (Woodstra). Ridiculous isn't an embarrassing attempt to rewrite previous hits, but rather, a natural progression executed with a dignified maturity rather than resignation” (Woodstra).

“This…album came out to little fanfare in the States, though Squeeze continued to be a solid draw in their homeland England, with a back catalog justifiably revered by their following” (CdUniverse.com). Chris Difford and Glenn Tilbrook, “the only original members left and still the band's primary songwriters” (Woodstra), offer up…smartly written and arranged odes to the ins and outs of life and love” (CdUniverse.com). The pair “seem content to have passed the Brit-pop torch on” (Woodstra).

“The record is jammed with distorted guitars, fat bass lines, plodding electric organ lines, and echoey drums. They get totally carried away with shameless Baby Boomer pandering on the record's one obvious potential hit ("Electric Trains"), a relatively upbeat effort with an enthusiastic beat and groovy string and backing vocal arrangements” (Alroy). “This is smart and stylish pop music for discerning listeners. The hooks are subtle and yield their rewards slowly but unshakably” (CdUniverse.com).

“As the band are wont to do, the album’s name shows up as simply a word in Daphne which has a chorus of ‘Daphne, don't be ridiculous’” (CdUniverse.com) and “a warped country-western vibe that's a little amusing” (Alroy).

Meanwhile, Squeeze maintain another odd trend in that the most obvious single was not the first released. “Electric Trains is a heartfelt reminiscence back to a boyhood transition from the hobby mentioned in the title to a guitar and a band” (CdUniverse.com). It makes a perfect single, so logically This Summer, a decent, but not as catchy, song was chosen to come out of the gates first instead.

Elsewhere on the album is Grouch of the Day, “a moderately successful attempt at emulating [The Beatles’] Revolver [with it's] bouncy, reverby 12-string sound” (Alroy), “Great Escape has a funky chorus worthy of Midnight Oil” (Alroy), and I Want You, which “gets a big bombastic string arrangement” (Alroy). There’s also Long Face, “a moody, thoroughly modernized electronic dance number with a breathless, distorted Chris Difford lead vocal” (Alroy).

“The gorgeous Temptation for Love finds Tilbrook dueting with one Cathy Denis whose parallel singing is like a soft drop shadow” (CdUniverse.com). ”The very mellow love song…sounds much like early 70’s Stevie Wonder” (Alroy).

When all is said and done, this album falls into the same pile as most of Squeeze’s output – a collection of well-written and sung shoulda-been hits that go nowhere fast. Then again, “catchy” isn’t enough to make an album a classic and while this album may be able to boast of catchiness, it can’t call itself a classic.


Review Source(s):


Related DMDB Link(s):

previous album: Some Fantastic Place (1993) Squeeze’s DMDB page next album: Domino (1998)


Last updated January 17, 2009.