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Released: March 1978


Rating: 3.064 (average of 11 ratings)


Genre: new wave pop/rock


Quotable: --


Album Tracks:

  1. Sex Master [2:21]
  2. Bang Bang [2:04]
  3. Strong In Reason [4:14]
  4. Wild Sewerage Tickles Brazil (Instrumental) (Squeeze) [3:49]
  5. Out of Control [4:44]
  6. Take Me I'm Yours [3:46]
  7. The Call [5:17]
  8. Model [2:59]
  9. Remember What [2:51]
  10. First Thing Wrong [3:43]
  11. Hesitation (Rool Britannia) [3:45]
  12. Get Smart [2:06]
All songs written by Difford & Tilbrook unless noted otherwise.


Total Running Time: 41:43


Sales:

sales in U.S. only --
sales in U.K. only - estimated --
sales in all of Europe as determined by IFPI – click here to go to their site. --
sales worldwide - estimated --


Peak:

peak on U.S. Billboard album chart --
peak on U.K. album chart --


Singles/Hit Songs:

  • Take Me I’m Yours (2/3/78) #19 UK
  • Bang Bang (6/10/78) #49 UK


Notes: The 1997 UK re-release added bonus tracks “Deep Cuts” and “Heartbreak.”


Squeeze (aka “U.K. Squeeze”)
Squeeze
Review:
Squeeze’s debut was released in the U.S. as U.K. Squeeze to avoid confusion with another band. When that band went defunct, Squeeze dropped the U.K. from their name for their sophomore album. Whatever you call the first album, it “is quite unlike anything that would follow and nearly seems like the work of another band” (Woodstra). The album “had no shortage of youthful exuberance.The careful pop craftsmanship, a hallmark of their subsequent work, was not yet in place. Instead the album offers high-octane arrangements and production approaches” (half.ebay.com).

”The disc shows their true colors as traditional rockers, even if it's impossible to hear any connection with the contemporary punk movement. They already have their harmony arrangements figured out, but the rhythm section kicks hard, and Tilbrook lays on the most unrestrained guitar solos you'll hear anywhere in their catalog” (Alroy).

”Much of the reason for this comes from producer John Cale's somewhat warped vision of the band. Cale threw out all of the songs the band came to the studio with and demanded that they write new ones on the spot (he also proposed calling the album Gay Guys, and undoubtedly had something to do with the hot pink bodybuilder cover and the shirtless photo of the band on the back)” (Woodstra).

The rough and ragged songs that resulted from the studio writing range from raw, inspired rockers like” (Woodstra) Sex Master and Get Smart, which “have some genuine boogie woogie energy” (Alroy), and “Difford’s competent ballad spotlight Strong in Reason (Alroy), “to the utterly bizarre, near-funk instrumental Wild Sewerage Tickles Brazil, which features wild shrieks throughout” (Woodstra).

”Tbere's some random jamming on The Call and a lot of the tunes…are lyrically gimmicky (Model; Difford's rap on Hesitation (Rool Brittania))” (Alroy). "Out of Control and Remember What are respectable Elvis Costello-style head-bangers, and Bang Bang has a demented chorus and an interesting, foot-stomping beat” (Alroy).

One definite highlight is the “band-produced…Take Me I'm Yours” (half.ebay.com), a “fondly remembered” (Woodstra) “minor British hit” (half.ebay.com) “driven by a really annoying, robotic synth line that would have been worthy of the Cars” (Alroy).

“There's…not a lot of variety, outside of ‘Take Me’ and one loud electric blues (First Thing Wrong), but at least it's energetic” (Alroy). In addition, “the fine songwriting of Glenn Tilbrook and Chris Difford was already in place (indeed, they had been writing together throughout their teenage years)” (half.ebay.com).

”Though not as refined as they would soon become, this album did serve to announce their arrival” (half.ebay.com). “The album in general remains an oddity of the Squeeze catalog” (Woodstra).


Review Source(s):


Related DMDB Link(s):

Squeeze’s DMDB page next album: Cool for Cats (1979)


Last updated January 17, 2009.